Old Orange Tree Care: How Can You Extend The Fruit-Bearing Years Of Your Tree?

If your orange tree is over 50 years of age, you may wonder if it's capable of yielding anymore fruit. Most orange trees can produce fruit for 50 years or more. With the right care, some trees can live as long as a 100 years or more and still bear fruit. Two of the things you might inadvertently do to harm your tree is prune it incorrectly or at the wrong time. Both issues might damage your tree and keep it from yielding any more fruit. Here are some thing you can do to help extend the fruit-bearing years of your old orange tree.

When Should You Prune an Older Orange Tree?

As with all older trees, pruning your aging orange tree too often can harm it. You should prune your citrus tree every five to 10 years, between February and April. Pruning removes crisscrossed and diseased branches and limbs that prevent sunlight and oxygen from nourishing the tree. 

If you don't remember when you last pruned your orange tree, it's a good idea that you have an arborist examine it. An arborist is a tree service specialist who treats all types of trees for disease, over-pruning, insects, and a host of other issues. The specialist will generally assess the orange tree's bark to see if it's healthy, as well as check the formation of the tree's limbs and branches.

Limbs and branches that rub against each as they grow out can create wounds that attract disease-causing pests and organisms. Overgrown branches can also cause physical damage to your home's structure and landscape. To extend the life of your elder tree and protect your property, it's important that you correct these issues immediately. 

After pruning the tree, it's time to take additional steps to help it produce fruit.

What Can You Do to Help Your Tree Bear Fruit?

Placing a coating of latex paint on the bark of the tree helps ward off rot, insects and disease. The bark is also vulnerable to sun damage, which may inhibit the tree's growth and stability. Coating the trunk of the tree with paint protects it from the sun and other types of problems. 

Here's what you do:

  1. Purchase a 1-quart can of oil-free, white latex paint from your local home and gardening store. Don't use any paints that say "enamel." Enamel paint can damage the tree's bark.
  2. Pour the paint into a large container, then add 1 quart of water to it. You want to dilute the paint with equal amounts of water.
  3. Use a wide paint brush to coat the tree's trunk. Be sure to cover the base of the tree with the paint.
  4. Add a second coat of paint to the first coat after it dries. 

Retouch the paint if it begins to fade over time. If you don't feel comfortable painting the tree, contact an arborist for assistance.

If you need additional help with your old orange tree, consult with a tree service provider today. You can also visit websites like http://www.kctreecaresiteks.com/home.html.


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